Thursday, January 31, 2008

Review: Two ACARS Log Analyzers for Windows

(This was originally part 1 of the post below, but I split it off to make the posts shorter.)

Along with the Dynamic Data Exchange path described in the post just below, some listeners are adding ACARS log analyzers to crunch the data from acarsd.

What you do here is run acarsd with yet another DDE server active, and add yet another client application! That's five simultaneously running programs, for those with the courage to keep count, and yes, you still have to start them in order of the data flow. It all works, at least on my hot dual-core XP Professional system with 2 gig of RAM. All these ones and zeroes churn around inside the machine. Messages appear on screens at various intervals, and ultimately get written to the analyzer database.

I'm not sure these analyzers are worth it for HF, though. I tried two of them. Some people love each of them, so they obviously work well enough to fill their needs. Once again, the price is right, as in free. However, I'm more oriented to DXing and finding new catches than plane spotting, and I'm not sure either program added that much more to acarsd to justify the increased level of complexity.

For a start, neither program seemed to contain an easy way to display the ICAO 24-bit hex addresses, though I understand from various Internet chatter that this may be added soon. My real problems seemed to come from both programs' heavy reliance on various data handling features in the Windows operating system itself. Those of us who have spent years fighting with these know what a mess THAT can create!

After the glowing review that another MT column gave the first one I tried, known as ACARS Log Analyser (British spelling), I couldn't wait to get it going. For whatever reason, though, my results weren't as good as his.

It's possible that my problems were caused by Windows DLL conflicts. It's fine for radio freeware to want to replace multiple shared DLLs with older ones. However, it's also my policy not to let these installers do so, because the resulting unpredictable problems with other, more important (or expensive!) apps can really be a mess.

Perhaps this is why the Log Analyser was so fussy, not to mention prone to all manner of arcane error messages, some of which crashed the program. After working through several truly bizarre logic bombs, I finally got the DDE working, sort of.

I never did get my older logs to import. Only one format worked at all, and this one corrupted all the records to have dates 20 years from now. Since I doubt even the NRD-545 can hear into the future, I finally put this program out of its misery with a full uninstall. Since this is Windows, there were a few harmless dregs left in the Registry, but nothing too critical.

Next up, I tried Acars Analyser (Australian spelling). It's right here. This one is a bit slicker, with pretty little icons and an interface generally more to my personal liking. Even better, its installer didn't ask to change any DLLs at all.

I also like the way the software is structured into two parts. One of these is a DDE client, which (like acarsds) connects to any number of programs and then sits happily in the background. The setup screen for this client is accessible, and comprehensive. The other part is the actual analyzer. It works with an external database using Jet (the MS data engine, not an aircraft type). Many items are stored, and these can be massaged in a truly impressive number of ways.

Unfortunately, that's all I can really say about this program. It never got a fair trial on my machine. It, too, seemed fussy. I never got past the initial stages of file not found errors and an occasional hang when I tried to access the database.

This might have been my fault. I became confused during the installation, and later I was able to find multiple database file paths in the Registry. It's possible the code became confused too. Also, according to the programmer, the public databases that make several of the better features work suddenly stopped being maintained, crippling these until an alternative is found.

At this point, I decided that I really wasn't going to use this program very much for what I was doing, and I uninstalled it. The end of this project is at hand, with Posfix and acarsd doing the job just fine. I've come to like these a lot.

Happy buzzing on HF!

Monday, January 28, 2008

Review: Several Windows ACARS Programs

It all started when the hard core HFDL enthusiasts on the Yahoo! group told me that you could connect Charles Brain's great PC-HFDL program to other data processing applications via Windows DDE.

If this last sentence is total gobbledygook to you, well it would also have been to me about three months ago. I would imagine one of the fancy (and pricey) high-end ACARS packages would do all this stuff with a fraction of the geeking, but fortunately I like to geek. After all, this is amateur radio.

Acarsd and PC-HFDL

I'd read good things about a free program suite called acarsd. You can download it at acarsd.org. It's a rather comprehensive ACARS package, with all the features that the hard core aviation geeks have come to expect, such as real-time fetching of aircraft data, including photos, from plane spotting sites.

Acarsd contains a decoder, but for HF I really wanted to continue using PC-HFDL for the transport layer. You need the commercial PC-HFDL version to do DDE. It's a nice little program, especially in its newest 2.041 beta, which adds some features and generally improves the decode.

Unfortunately, Vista broke it, along with most other shareware/freeware sound card radio decoders. This is a problem since Charles, as of last year at least, didn't have access to a Vista box to develop the fixes. Users of GOOD operating systems, such as Windows XP Pro, will have no problems, though it definitely likes some sound cards more than others.

Getting back to acarsd, it's a remarkable package for the price (free, though donations are encouraged). It also has a Linux version. It is configurable to do just about anything, mostly by manually tweaking the self-documenting .ini file. Other documentation is pretty minimal.

In order to send PC-HFDL decodes to Acarsd, you need the "SkySpy Socket Collector," an accompanying DDE server application which is called acarsds. This program, which is bundled with newer versions of acarsd, works like a charm. Its documentation, though, is extremely out of date.

For example, you are told to download acarsds separately, and install it to its own directory. You don't have to. You are told that you need a specific Visual Basic runtime library. Unless your Windows is ME or older, you almost certainly don't. Finally, you are told not to even bother downloading it if you have Windows XP, because this OS isn't supported by SkySpy. Even if, years later, this is still the case, it's irrelevant for us.

The DDE setup is a complete no-brainer. Soon, you have this neat little server happily passing your ACARS messages to the cool acarsd graphic user interface. Not long after, you notice that many of the interesting HFDL downlinks don't display, because technically they are HFNPDU PERFORMANCE messages, not ACARS. Too bad, because most of these have the position of the aircraft.

POSFIX

Fear not. This is where POSFIX comes in. It's also free, and you get it right here. The latest version in January 2008 is 2.34, though a newer version that adds SBS and some other features is in beta. Posfix is also minimally documented at best, though the help does tell you how to make the program work.

What Posfix does is to reformat the HFDL positions into pseudo-ACARS messages which get sent to acarsd and displayed. Acarsd gets a lot more interesting, and your logs get bigger faster, though you also get a lot of NO-REG for missing registration numbers.

What you do is to set Posfix as a DDE client for PC-HFDL, and then set acarsds as a client for Posfix. This results in the following DDE path:

PC-HFDL > Posfix > acarsds > acarsd.

Also, things crash if you don't start servers first and clients second. This means you start PC-HFDL, get it going on a frequency, then work left to right along the path shown above. Posfix connects to PC-HFDL, and messages start appearing in its window. Acarsds connects to Posfix, and messages appear there. Acarsd connects to acarsds, and messages appear there, in its slick formatting, and including the position checks. Also you can plot with Posfix, though unless you're monitoring the North Atlantic run you'll want to make some more maps. Fortunately, this is stupidly easy.

This took me a couple hours of tweaking to get right, but the results are worth it.

UPDATE: This post has been split into two parts to decrease its length. The second part should be above.

Tuesday, January 22, 2008

V2x Is Again Nine-Less

Haven't heard any at all since that one transmission.

Oh, well.

Meanwhile the digital SK01 transmissions continue.

Sunday, January 20, 2008

HAARP HF Earth-Moon-Earth Echoes!

The HAARP project in Alaska has been transmitting 3.9 megawatt carrier in the direction of the moon, so that a receiving site in another location can take data on the lunar surface (and just below) by analyzing the echoes received.

HF lunar echoes are not the kind of thing one hears every day. THIS is DX.

On the second night of the test, January 20 UTC, echoes were received here in California on the second frequency (7407.5 kHz CW) for a considerable period around 0740-0800 UTC. Here is a typical spectrogram as received on a PAR End-Fedz wire and plotted with Spectrum Lab:



The HAARP carrier is being keyed down for 2 seconds (and received here via the ionosphere) and then a 3-second silence is provided to listen for the delayed (and slightly Doppler shifted, apparently) lunar echoes. The HAARP (ionosphere) reception is at 40, 45, 50, 55, and 00 sec. The echoes are clearly seen in between, down about 10-15 dB.


More on this EME experiment is here.

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

V02a Has 9's!

Yesterday I noted that the Cuban voice numbers transmissions (V02a, V02c) have recently had very few, if any, appearances of the figure "9" (nueve) in the Spanish messages.

This was true until this morning.

17435 is as loud as ever at 1700, and has plenty of 9's, as if a software issue had been addressed.

Do they read this stuff?

Monday, January 14, 2008

The Woodpecker Is Dead, But Enter the Dragon

China's HF "Dragon" over-the-horizon backscatter (OTH-B) radar may be getting more troublesome for other radio services as that country continues to modernize and build out its military capability. This radar system transmits complex tone bursts spread out over several kilohertz. It has caused an enormous problem for Asian weak signal CW operations in the 40 meter amateur band, though I've never heard it here.

Developing...

SK01 Has 9's

As many people have noticed, the number "9" is rarely (if ever) heard in the V2a Cuban voice numbers broadcasts. If the encryption is random, it seems odd that there wouldn't be any 9s. Why would this figure be excluded? Why is it present in filenames/headers for SK01 (the digital file transfers)?

One more mystery wrapped in a riddle shrouded in an enigma, no pun intended. (After all the German ENIGMA code had 9s.)

Is Cuba Going RDFT?

Probably not, but it's sure increasing, in a manner suggesting it may now be operational. From Jon in FL, as posted to Spooks, ENIGMA, and everywhere else:

2008-01-08 at 1800z on 8097 kHz AM SK01 RDFT
1800z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes
1808z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
1812z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
1817z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes
1819z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
1822z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
1827z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
1832z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes
1838z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
1842z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
1847z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes
1852z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
1856z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes

2008-01-08 at 1900z on 8097 kHz AM SK01 RDFT
1900z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes
1905z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
1910z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
1915z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes
1916z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
1920z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
1925z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
1930z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes
1935z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
1940z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
1945z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes
1946z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
1950z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes

2008-01-08 at 2000z on 7887 kHZ AM SK01 RDFT
2000z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
2005z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
2011z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes
2015z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
2021z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
2025z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes
2032z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
2036z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
2040z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
2045z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes

2008-01-08 at 2100z on 6855 kHz AM SK01 RDFT
2100z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
2106z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
2111z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
2115z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
2120z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes
2125z 48762671.TXT 190 Bytes
2130z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
2137z 42645902.TXT 790 Bytes
2140z 45973423.TXT 461 Bytes

Shuttle Launch Now On/After February 7


Jan. 11, 2008

Allard Beutel
Kennedy Space Center, Fla.
321-867-2468
allard.beutel@nasa.gov

Michael Curie
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-4715
michael.curie@nasa.gov

James Hartsfield
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
james.a.hartsfield@nasa.gov

MEDIA ADVISORY: M08-06

NASA ANNOUNCES SPACE SHUTTLE LAUNCH TARGETS

HOUSTON - NASA Friday announced Feb. 7 as the target launch date for shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission to the International Space Station and mid-March for the launch of Endeavour on STS-123. Liftoff of Atlantis from NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Fla., will be at 2:47 p.m. EST.

A decision by the Russian Federal Space Agency to move up its Progress launch from Feb. 7 to Feb. 5 enables both STS-122 and STS-123 to launch before the next Russian Soyuz mission in early April. This allows astronauts assigned to the space station's Expedition 16 crew to complete the tasks they have trained for, including support of the launch and docking of Jules Verne, the first European Space Agency Automated Transfer Vehicle. Targeting Feb. 7 also allows time to complete modifications to the engine cutoff sensor system that postponed two shuttle launch attempts in December.

Atlantis' main objective during its STS-122 mission to the station is to install and activate the European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory, which will provide scientists around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in life, physical, and materials science, Earth observation and solar physics.

Shuttle Endeavour's STS-123 mission will deliver Kibo, the first section of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's laboratory module, and Dextre, Canada's new robotics system to the space station.

NASA managers will meet in the coming weeks to address the schedule of remaining shuttle flights beyond STS-123.

For the latest shuttle information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle


-end-

Saturday, January 05, 2008

San Francisco HFDL Back On-Air

If you heard nothing yesterday on any of San Francisco ARINC ground station 01's frequencies, well no one else did either. The timing suggests problems connected to the storm which hit the Sacramento area with flooding and hurricane-force wind gusts.

10081 is operating at full power at present.

Another storm connected situation exists in a small Nevada town east of Reno, where a breach in the levee of a water canal has flooded 600 homes, requiring boat and helicopter rescues.

Friday, January 04, 2008

HFDL System Table 32/ 20 Hex Now In Use

Just when we thought maybe table #31/1F might get us all the way through the winter, ARINC has updated its ground stations to frequency table number 32, or 20 in the hexadecimal notation the HFDL system uses.

According to several posts to the HFDL group on Yahoo, the only change is to fix a frequency error in version 31/1F that had aircraft looking for Shannon on 2988 kHz, while the ground station squittered away all alone on 2998. It seems awfully coincidental that the mistake was corrected right after the frequency anomaly was discovered and discussed on this same group. It would be very cool if this hobby, and not just a coincidence, was indeed the reason ARINC fixed it. Always glad to be of service.

Let's hope that Shannon now gets more activity on those long winter nights.

The new pchfdl.dat file has been posted to this column's web site. It should be the same one as posted to the Yahoo group, and successfully installed here. Rename your old pchfdl.dat and copy this one in its place, then start PC-HFDL and it should show the frequencies instead of just numbers.

We thank the Yahoo group people for being so on top of things.

-= ADDED 0531 UTC =-

Here is the full system table, as just transmitted by San Francisco:

[LPDU UNNUMBERED DATA FM GND TO AIR BRD]
[SYSTEM TABLE]
Number of Packets in Table 6
Version 020

Ground Station ID 1 SAN FRANCISCO - CALIFORNIA UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 121 45 34 W Latitude 38 22 48 N
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 10
Frequency 21934000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 17919000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12
Frequency 13276000 Hz Master Frame Slot 8
Frequency 11327000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 10081000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 8927000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12
Frequency 6559000 Hz Master Frame Slot 8
Frequency 5508000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 4672000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 2947000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12

Ground Station ID 2 MOLOKAI - HAWAII UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 157 10 46 W Latitude 21 10 47 N
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 20
Frequency 21937000 Hz Master Frame Slot 0
Frequency 21928000 Hz Master Frame Slot 0
Frequency 17934000 Hz Master Frame Slot 7
Frequency 17919000 Hz Master Frame Slot 7
Frequency 13276000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 11348000 Hz Master Frame Slot 11
Frequency 11312000 Hz Master Frame Slot 11
Frequency 10081000 Hz Master Frame Slot 11
Frequency 8936000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 8912000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 6559000 Hz Master Frame Slot 0
Frequency 5538000 Hz Master Frame Slot 7
Frequency 5529000 Hz Master Frame Slot 7
Frequency 5508000 Hz Master Frame Slot 7
Frequency 5463000 Hz Master Frame Slot 7
Frequency 3434000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 3019000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 3001000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 2947000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 2878000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3

Ground Station ID 3 REYKJAVIK - ICELAND UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 21 50 59 W Latitude 64 4 47 N
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 8
Frequency 17985000 Hz Master Frame Slot 11
Frequency 15025000 Hz Master Frame Slot 7
Frequency 11184000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 8977000 Hz Master Frame Slot 0
Frequency 6712000 Hz Master Frame Slot 11
Frequency 5720000 Hz Master Frame Slot 7
Frequency 3900000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 3116000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3

Ground Station ID 4 RIVERHEAD - NEW YORK UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 72 38 22 W Latitude 40 52 47 N
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 20
Frequency 21934000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 21931000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 17952000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9
Frequency 17934000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9
Frequency 17919000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9
Frequency 13276000 Hz Master Frame Slot 5
Frequency 11387000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 11354000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 11315000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 10027000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 8912000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9
Frequency 8885000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9
Frequency 8831000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9
Frequency 6661000 Hz Master Frame Slot 5
Frequency 6652000 Hz Master Frame Slot 5
Frequency 6646000 Hz Master Frame Slot 5
Frequency 5652000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 5523000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 3428000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9
Frequency 3410000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9

Ground Station ID 5 AUCKLAND - NEW ZEALAND UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 174 48 35 E Latitude 37 1 10 S
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 10
Frequency 21949000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 17916000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12
Frequency 13351000 Hz Master Frame Slot 8
Frequency 11327000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 10084000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 8921000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12
Frequency 6535000 Hz Master Frame Slot 8
Frequency 5583000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 3404000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12
Frequency 3016000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12

Ground Station ID 6 HAT YAI - THAILAND UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 100 23 24 E Latitude 6 56 23 N
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 9
Frequency 21949000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 17928000 Hz Master Frame Slot 6
Frequency 13270000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 10066000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 8825000 Hz Master Frame Slot 6
Frequency 6535000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 5655000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 4687000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 3470000 Hz Master Frame Slot 6

Ground Station ID 7 SHANNON - IRELAND UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 8 55 46 W Latitude 52 43 48 N
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 8
Frequency 11384000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 10081000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 8942000 Hz Master Frame Slot 6
Frequency 8843000 Hz Master Frame Slot 6
Frequency 6532000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 5547000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 3455000 Hz Master Frame Slot 6
Frequency 2998000 Hz Master Frame Slot 6

Ground Station ID 8 JOHANNESBURG - SOUTH AFRICA UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 28 12 35 E Latitude 26 7 46 S
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 5
Frequency 21949000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 13321000 Hz Master Frame Slot 6
Frequency 8834000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 4681000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 3016000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2

Ground Station ID 9 BARROW - ALASKA UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 156 46 46 W Latitude 71 18 0 N
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 19
Frequency 21937000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 21928000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 17934000 Hz Master Frame Slot 6
Frequency 17919000 Hz Master Frame Slot 6
Frequency 11354000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 10093000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 10027000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 8936000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 8927000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 6646000 Hz Master Frame Slot 6
Frequency 5544000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 5538000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 5529000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 4687000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 4654000 Hz Master Frame Slot 2
Frequency 3497000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 3007000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 2992000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10
Frequency 2944000 Hz Master Frame Slot 10

Ground Station ID 14 KRASNOYARSK - RUSSIA UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 92 18 0 E Latitude 56 6 0 N
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 10
Frequency 21990000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 17912000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12
Frequency 13321000 Hz Master Frame Slot 8
Frequency 10087000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 8886000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12
Frequency 6596000 Hz Master Frame Slot 8
Frequency 5622000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 4679000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 2905000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12
Frequency 2878000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12

Ground Station ID 13 SANTA CRUZ - BOLIVIA UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 63 7 46 W Latitude 17 40 11 S
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 12
Frequency 21997000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 21988000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 21973000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 21946000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 17916000 Hz Master Frame Slot 11
Frequency 13315000 Hz Master Frame Slot 7
Frequency 11318000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 8957000 Hz Master Frame Slot 11
Frequency 6628000 Hz Master Frame Slot 7
Frequency 4660000 Hz Master Frame Slot 3
Frequency 3467000 Hz Master Frame Slot 11
Frequency 2983000 Hz Master Frame Slot 11

Ground Station ID 16 AGANA - GUAM UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 144 48 0 E Latitude 13 28 11 N
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 7
Frequency 17919000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9
Frequency 13312000 Hz Master Frame Slot 5
Frequency 11306000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 11288000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 8927000 Hz Master Frame Slot 5
Frequency 6652000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 5451000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9

Ground Station ID 15 AL MUHARRAQ - BAHRAIN UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 50 39 0 E Latitude 26 16 12 N
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 8
Frequency 21982000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 17967000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9
Frequency 13354000 Hz Master Frame Slot 5
Frequency 11312000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 10075000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1
Frequency 8885000 Hz Master Frame Slot 9
Frequency 5544000 Hz Master Frame Slot 5
Frequency 2986000 Hz Master Frame Slot 1

Ground Station ID 17 CANARIAS - SPAIN UTC UNLOCKED
Longitude 15 23 23 W Latitude 27 56 59 N
Squitter Version 0
Number of frequencies 8
Frequency 21955000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 17928000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12
Frequency 13303000 Hz Master Frame Slot 8
Frequency 11348000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 8948000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12
Frequency 6529000 Hz Master Frame Slot 8
Frequency 5589000 Hz Master Frame Slot 4
Frequency 2905000 Hz Master Frame Slot 12

New HFDL System Table?

The Molokai HFDL ground station is reporting that system table #32 (20 hex) is now current. Users of PC-HFDL will need to update their data file, and everyone else will need the new freqs, though there shouldn't be a huge change.

More details when this blog gets them.